Upcoming Events: Climate One

Tue 4/25

Image - Texas flags and wind power

Texas Surprise

Date: Tue, April 25, 2017
Time: 6:30 PM
The Lone Star State's energy leadership

Skip Averitt, Chair, Texas Clean Energy Coalition; Republican Former State Senator
Stephanie Smith, COO, Greencastle LLC
Pat Wood III, Principal, Wood3 Resources
Greg Dalton, Founder and Host, Climate One
Additional Speakers TBA

When Californians think of Texas, images of JR Ewing and pump jacks quickly come to mind. But the Lone Star State is greener than you think. It leads the country in wind power, thanks to a law signed by Governor George W. Bush. Texans also claim the state can comply with President Obama’s Clean Power Plan with technologies and policies already on hand. Ranchers and former oil men are dipping their toes into renewable energy. What else is in the clean energy pipeline?

Join a conversation with Texas energy leaders about fossil fuels and renewables in America’s most prominent energy-exporting state.

Sat 4/29

Image - New Political Climate

The New Political Climate

Date: Sat, April 29, 2017
Time: 4:30 PM
March on climate change

May Boeve, Executive Director, 350.org
Debbie Dooley, President, Conservatives for Energy Freedom; Co-Founder, Tea Party Movement 
Greg Dalton, Founder and Host, Climate One
Additional Speakers TBA

The 2014 Climate March in New York and other cities helped solidify public support in the run-up to the Paris climate accord the next year. But these days climate advocates are playing defense and trying to keep the Paris Agreement together. Will the Washington march have any impact on the politics related to climate change in the United States? Where can clean energy advance in the current political context?

Join Climate One as we go on the road for the People’s Climate Movement in Washington, D.C.

Thu 5/4

Image - New York

How Cities Can Solve the Climate Challenge

Date: Thu, May 04, 2017
Time: 6:30 PM
Cities combating climate change

Carl PopeCo-Author (with Michael Bloomberg), Climate of Hope: How Cities, Businesses, and Citizens Can Save the Planet; Former Executive Director, Sierra Club
Diane Doucette, Co-Founder and Executive Director, Chambers for Innovation and Clean Energy
Elizabeth Patterson, Mayor of Benicia, California
Rod G. Sinks, City Council Member of Cupertino, California
Greg Dalton, Founder and Host, Climate One

Mayors around the country are bypassing national politics and working around federal restrictions to both clean up their cities and foster growth in renewable energy. In red and blue states, local leaders are solving traffic congestion, promoting smart growth, and preparing for the impacts climate disruption will have on public health, roads and other infrastructure. Cities are a good news climate story; most reductions in carbon pollution actually happen at the city and regional level.

Carl Pope teamed with former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg to write a book about how cities are cleaning up their regional economies. Join us for a conversation with an environmental legend and Bay Area leaders who are advancing sustainable communities despite enthusiasm for the brown economy in Washington, D.C. 

Mon 5/8

Image - Birds and Bees

The New Birds and Bees: Conversations About Climate

Date: Mon, May 08, 2017
Time: 6:30 PM
Boomers and millennials working together to address climate change

Carleen Cullen, Co-Founder and Executive Director, Cool the Earth
Michael Ranney, Professor, UC Berkeley’s Department of Psychology and the Graduate School of Education
Wilford Welch, Former U.S. Diplomat for the Nixon Administration; Author, In Our Hands: Handbook for Inter-generational Actions to Solve the Climate Crisis
Greg Dalton, Founder and Host, Climate One

Different generations do no often join forces and fight for a common cause. But, more than ever, bridges are now being built to cross the generational divide in the fight against climate change. Boomers and millennials are coming together, taking action on the issue, creating a dialogue and educating one another. With boomers providing the wealth and millennials providing the energy, this new dream team is coming together, ready to tackle important issues related to climate change.

Thu 5/11

Image - Standing Rock

Banking on Change at Standing Rock

Date: Thu, May 11, 2017
Time: 6:30 PM
The standoff over the Dakota Access Pipeline

L. Frank Manriquez, Indigenous California Artist, Activist
Pennie Opal Plant, Organizer, Idle No More SF Bay
Greg Dalton, Founder and Host, Climate One
Additional Speakers TBA

They were an unlikely group of activists; Native American youths concerned about teen suicide sparked the movement against the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL)—a movement which ultimately spread across the country. Veterans and others joined in, traveling to the construction site and showing solidarity with activists. Protesters objected to the $3.8 billion pipeline route, which they said threatened freshwater supplies and disrespected ancestral lands. Recently, in an attempt to pressure banks financing the project, Seattle yanked more than $3 billion in annual cash flows from Wells Fargo, giving the campaign a boost. The city of Davis also cut ties with the bank over the pipeline.

Still, the project is moving ahead and is nearly complete. What, then, did the protests accomplish? Are they any more than a temporary nuisance to energy companies? Join us for a conversation with those who have been at Standing Rock—and discover what it all means.

Thu 5/25

Image - GMOs

Rounding Up the Facts on GMOs

Date: Thu, May 25, 2017
Time: 12:00 PM
Debating the pros and cons of genetically modified food

Dr. John Purcell, Vice President and Global Research and Development Lead, Monsanto
Scott Hamilton Kennedy, Director, Food Evolution
Greg Dalton, Founder and Host, Climate One
Additional Speakers TBA

Are genetically modified food advocates the new "flat-earthers"? Are their opponents the new climate deniers? As with many issues these days, the two sides are working from different sets of facts. Monsanto, the agrochemical company, and other supporters of foods that include genetically modified organisms (GMOs) say using GMOs can promote more nutritious crops, improve farmer livelihood, foster drought tolerance and flood resilience, reduce chemical pesticide use, and end hunger. Food advocates say those claims are false. They note that GMO foods promote industrial monoculture, concentrate corporate power in a few hands and drive the use of glyphosate, which has been labeled a carcinogen by the World Health Organization’s cancer agency and is now the subject of a class action lawsuit in California. Both critics and supporters were displeased by a law passed last year requiring the future labeling of GMO foods.

Join us for a conversation about facts, science and the truth about eating and labeling GMO foods.