Upcoming Events: Climate One

Wed 5/24

Image - Water Whiplash

Water Whiplash

Date: Wed, May 24, 2017
Time: 6:30 PM
From shortage to surplus

Felicia Marcus, Chair, California Water Resources Control Board
Buzz Thompson, Director, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment
Greg Dalton, Founder and Host, Climate One

This program is made possible by support from the S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation.

Californians are accustomed to living through wet times and dry times, but lately things are getting more extreme and much more difficult to predict. After five years of severe drought, Californians are now talking about what it means to have too much water. The end of the drought is a blessing, but the state may need to find $50 billion to repair dams, roads and other infrastructure threatened by floods. The damaged spillway at Oroville Dam highlighted what happens when the state doesn’t keep its water system in good working order.

How is California preparing for the whiplash of going from really dry to really wet years? What will it take to fix the system that delivers the water that keeps us alive and lubricates our economy? How will state and federal governments work together to modernize the water systems responsible for growing the food that lands on our dinner tables?

Thu 5/25

Image - GMOs

Rounding up the Facts on GMOs

Date: Thu, May 25, 2017
Time: 12:00 PM
Debating the pros and cons of genetically modified food

Marcia Ishii-Eiteman, Senior Scientist and Director Grassroots Science Program, Pesticide Action Network
Dr. John Purcell, Vice President and Global Research and Development Lead, Monsanto
Scott Hamilton Kennedy, Director, Food Evolution
Austin Wilson, Environmental Health Program Manager, As You Sow
Greg Dalton, Founder and Host, Climate One

Are genetically modified food advocates the new "flat-earthers"? Are their opponents the new climate deniers? As with many issues these days, the two sides are working from different sets of facts. Monsanto, the agrochemical company, and other supporters of foods that include genetically modified organisms (GMOs) say using GMOs can promote more nutritious crops, improve farmer livelihood, foster drought tolerance and flood resilience, reduce chemical pesticide use, and end hunger. Food advocates say those claims are false. They note that GMO foods promote industrial monoculture, concentrate corporate power in a few hands and drive the use of glyphosate, which has been labeled a carcinogen by the World Health Organization’s cancer agency and is now the subject of a class action lawsuit in California. Both critics and supporters were displeased by a law passed last year requiring the future labeling of GMO foods.

Join us for a conversation about facts, science and the truth about eating and labeling GMO foods. 

Thu 6/1

Image - Trumping the Climate

Trumping the Climate: Coming in Hot

Date: Thu, June 01, 2017
Time: 6:30 PM
The Trump administration's attempts to alter climate policy

Gil Duran, Former Spokesman for Governor Jerry Brown and U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein
Amy Myers Jaffe, Executive Director of Sustainability, UC Davis Graduate School of Management
Jim Sweeney, Director, Precourt Energy Efficiency Center at Stanford University
Greg Dalton, Founder and Host, Climate One

The Trump administration’s determination to revive coal mining and domestic oil drilling is causing concern that international efforts to combat climate change will crumble. But how far will the new Trump team be able to shrink rules created under President Obama and as far back as President Nixon? U.S. Senator John McCain recently cast a deciding vote against a Republican effort to roll back restrictions on methane, a powerful heat-trapping gas. California, long the vanguard of environmental protections, vows to keep forging ahead with its climate agenda.

What are the new politics of carbon? How much change will the Trump administration really bring to the climate change fight? What are energy investors and companies doing in the new political context? Join a conversation about energy, markets and the mainstream news media.

Thu 6/8

Image - bike

Chain Reaction: Why Two Wheels Are Better Than Four

Date: Thu, June 08, 2017
Time: 6:30 PM
Using your bike to address climate change

Amy Harcourt, Co-Founder and Principal, Bikes Make Life Better Inc.
Caeli Quinn, Founder, Climate Ride
Brian Wiedenmeier, Executive Director, San Francisco Bicycle Coalition
Greg Dalton, Founder and Host, Climate One

Getting out of a car and onto a bike is one of the best things you can do for the climate and your personal health. Bike lanes are growing in American cities from New York City to Houston, the country’s oil and gasoline capital. Cycling is also a way for people to raise awareness and money for their climate work. Still, many potential cyclists are worried about their personal safety while biking—and about breathing bus exhaust.

What are cities doing to take cycling to the next level? Is bike sharing really displacing taxi rides? How is pedal power helping the broader climate movement? Join us for a conversation about cycling and the ways it is changing urban America and cutting carbon emissions.