Upcoming Events: Climate One

Wed 8/13

Image - Water Underfoot

Water Underfoot

Date: Wed, August 13, 2014
Time: 6:00 PM
How will California's historic drought change water policy?

Debbie Davis, Community & Rural Affairs Advisor, Office of Planning and Research, State of California
Felicia Marcus, Chair, State Water Resources Control Board
Barton Thompson, Jr., Professor of Natural Resources Law, Stanford Law School

The historic drought is driving farmers and communities to suck more water out of the ground. That can lead to salt water leaking into aquifers and the creation of sinkholes. California manages and monitors its groundwater much more loosely than other Western states. The new fracking law and other measures are gradually changing that, but the Golden State still needs to improve how it handles a precious economic resource. Will the drought finally drive California to improve the way it uses the water under our feet? Join us for an update on keeping the water flowing in dry times.

Climate One Connect
Audience members are invited to engage in breakout group conversations led by speakers for 20 minutes following the program. We hope you’ll take part in this unique opportunity to delve deeper into today's water concerns.

Thu 8/21

Image - Keystone & Beyond

Keystone & Beyond

Date: Thu, August 21, 2014
Time: 6:00 PM
The true impact of depending on the Keystone pipeline.

David Baker, Energy Reporter, San Francisco Chronicle
John Cushman, Author, Keystone & Beyond; Former Reporter, The New York Times
Additional panelist TBA

With American oil production increasing and domestic demand in decline, does it make sense to build the Keystone XL pipeline? The Keystone battle is one of the biggest political fights over energy in decades and could shape President Obama’s legacy. Supporters say it will provide reliable energy from a friendly neighbor, adding that if the oil doesn’t come here, it will go to Asia. Opponents say that building it will commit the U.S. to some of the dirtiest fuel on Earth and send a message that the country is not serious about stabilizing the climate.

Keystone is just one hunk of metal in a web of energy infrastructure. There are 2.5 million miles of pipeline that carry energy around the United States. As a recent accident in Lynchburg, Virginia, demonstrated, transporting the oil by rail is dangerous. Furthermore, other pipelines are in the works to get the oil to ports and global markets.

John Cushman’s book on Keystone tells the story of the country’s most discussed piece of pipe. He will tell that story and be joined by two other reporters for a discussion of how the U.S. can maintain its economy while getting off fossil fuels before frying the planet. Will divestment from fossil fuels have any impact on capital and energy markets? Is attacking supply an effective strategy for decarbonizing the economy? Join a conversation with leading energy journalists on powering this country’s future.

Fri 9/12

Image - Climate on the Brain

Climate on the Brain

Date: Fri, September 12, 2014
Time: 12:00 PM
The psychology behind why humans ignore climate change.

George Marshall, Author, Don’t Even Think About It: Why Our Brains Are Wired to Ignore Climate Change
Dacher Keltner, Professor of Psychology, UC Berkeley

Abundant scientific evidence demonstrates that climate disruption is happening in all 50 states now and many Americans are directly experiencing impacts. Yet many people are failing to do all they can to reduce carbon pollution and build a resilient future. Are we mad? Or are we simply human?

While fossil fuels are challenges on many systemic levels – biological, economic, political, international – one of the most daunting obstacles is human cognition. Human brains are wired to detect threats such as tigers in the bush and are not well equipped for odorless invisible gases coming out our own tailpipes and pie holes.

Join us for a conversation about how extreme weather events could make us less concerned, not more. Does having children make people less concerned about climate change? What can people do to become informed and empowered?

Mon 9/15

Image - Deepak Chopra and Rinaldo Brutoco: Changing Energy, Changing Consciousne

Deepak Chopra and Rinaldo Brutoco: Changing Energy, Changing Consciousness

Date: Mon, September 15, 2014
Time: 9:00 AM
Exploring the deeper impact of energy consciousness.

Deepak Chopra, M.D., Mind-Body Physician; Author, The Soul of Leadership
Rinaldo Brutoco, President, Chopra Foundation; Founding President, World Business Academy; Author, Freedom from Mid-East Oil
Greg Dalton, Host and Founder, Climate One – Moderator

Our guests say that changing our choices about energy changes consciousness. Where should our energy come from – fossil fuels and nuclear plants? Or 100 percent safe, clean and renewable sources? Chopra and Brutoco say that because energy is the fundamental macro system of human society, once we change our consciousness about energy, we are capable of changing our consciousness about everything. Chopra and Brutoco will discuss the California Moonshot Project aimed at eliminating global warming and fossil fuels to lead the planetary shift toward safe energy. As a global leader and pioneer in the field of mind-body medicine, Chopra’s goal is to transform the way the world views physical, mental, emotional, spiritual and social wellness. Core areas of Brutoco’s work include clean energy, climate change analysis and mitigation as well as sustainable business strategy.

Go to Powering Innovation

Powering Innovation

Date: Mon, September 15, 2014
Time: 6:00 PM

Katie Fehrenbacher, Reporter, GigaOm
David Crane, CEO, NRG

Amazon, Apple, Google and your local power company: One of these things is not like the other. But NRG Energy executive David Crane says utilities should aspire to be in league with the strongest tech brands. What’s at stake? Electric companies must quickly find innovative ways to deliver clean and affordable energy, or more severe weather will destabilize the global economy. Government regulation alone won’t get the job done.

NRG is involved with some of the largest solar energy projects in the world including Ivanpah and Agua Caliente in California. Crane says consumers should have choices and that doesn’t mean deciding between powering your home today and the health of your family and our planet tomorrow. Katie Fehrenbacher writes about how innovative technologies are bringing exciting new changes to the way America produces and uses energy. Join us for a conversation about innovation, connected lifestyles and powering our future.