Upcoming Events: Good Lit

Tue 5/26

Image - Andrew Hodges: Alan Turing - The Man Who Inspired "The Imitation Game"

Andrew Hodges: Alan Turing - The Man Who Inspired "The Imitation Game"

Date: Tue, May 26, 2015
Time: 12:00 PM

Andrew Hodges, Professor, Senior Research Fellow, University of Oxford; Author, Alan Turing: The Enigma

In conversation with Kishore Hari, Director, Bay Area Science Festival

It is only a slight exaggeration to say that the British mathematician Alan Turing saved the Allies from the Nazis, invented the computer, and anticipated gay liberation by decades – all before his suicide at age 41. Turing’s revolutionary concept of a universal machine, which he realized in 1945 with his electronic design, laid the foundation for the modern computer. Even more critical at the time, Turing played a leading role in breaking the German Enigma ciphers during World War II, a scientific triumph that helped to swing the course of the war in the Atlantic.

At the same time, Turing, despite his wartime service, was eventually arrested and forced to undergo a humiliating treatment program – all for trying to live honestly in a society that defined homosexuality as a crime. Join us for insights into this remarkable man with the author of the book behind the Oscar-nominated film The Imitation Game.

Thu 5/28

Image - Former San Francisco Giant Bengie Molina and Joan Ryan

Former San Francisco Giant Bengie Molina and Joan Ryan

Date: Thu, May 28, 2015
Time: 6:30 PM
An inspiring true story

Bengie Molina, Former MLB Catcher (2007-2010), SF Giants; Co-author, Molina
Joan Ryan, Media Consultant, SF Giants; Co-author, Molina
In conversation with Roy Eisenhardt, Lecturer in Sports Law, UC Berkeley Law School; Former President, Oakland A's

Good Lit event underwritten by the Bernard Osher Foundation

The inspiring true story of the poor Puerto Rican factory worker, Benjamin Molina Santana, who against all odds raised the greatest baseball dynasty of all time: Molina's three sons – Bengie, Jose, and Yadier – have each earned two World Series rings, which is unprecedented in the sport, and his story is told by one of them, Bengie.

Bengie was the least likely to reach the majors. He was too slow, too sensitive and too small. But craving his beloved father’s respect, Bengie weathered failure after deflating failure until one day he was hoisting a World Series trophy in a champagne-soaked clubhouse. All along he thought he was fulfilling his father’s own failed dream of baseball glory, only to discover it had not been his father’s dream at all.

Wed 6/3

Image - Mark Bittman: A Bone to Pick

Mark Bittman: A Bone to Pick

Date: Wed, June 03, 2015
Time: 6:30 PM
A discussion on the complexities of the American food system.

Mark Bittman, Author, A Bone to Pick; Food Columnist, The New York Times; Twitter @bittman
In conversation with Naomi Starkman, Founder and Editor in Chief, Civil Eats; Twitter @NaomiStarkman

Part of the Good Lit series underwritten by the Bernard Osher Foundation.

New York Times food columnist Mark Bittman leaves no issue unexamined, scrutinizing everything from agricultural practices to government legislation and fad diets while praising the rise of slow-food movements, better school lunch programs, and even the concept of “healthy fast food.” One of the most impassioned and opinionated observers of the food landscape in the United States, Bittman routinely criticizes the staggering shortfalls of the American food system and the forces that regulate it, making us think twice about how the food we eat is produced, distributed and cooked.

Join Bittman for a discussion on the complexities of the American food system, his ideas about how we can improve upon these issues, and the impact that diet can have on our own health and that of the planet.

Mon 6/22

Image - Haiku Across Borders: From Japan to the United States

Haiku Across Borders: From Japan to the United States . . . and Back Again? Perspectives of an American Haiku Poet

Date: Mon, June 22, 2015
Time: 6:00 PM
With former U.S. diplomat Abigail Friedman

Abigail Friedman, Haiku Poet; Author, The Haiku Apprentice: Memoirs of Writing Poetry in Japan; Former U.S. Diplomat

Haiku, the 17-syllable poetic form from Japan, is today written by haiku poets worldwide - from 2011 Nobel Prize-winning Swedish poet Tomas Tranströmer, to American writer Richard Wright, to elementary school children across America. How has this traditional Japanese art form been understood – and misunderstood – as it made its way from Japan to America? How is haiku being written in Japan and America today and what can those two countries learn from each other? Abigail Friedman is a haiku poet, author and former diplomat posted at the U.S. Embassy in Japan. She won first prize at the Mainichi International Haiku Contest in Japan in 2014. Firmly planted in the worlds of haiku in Japan and North America, she will share her unique perspective.