Upcoming Events: Asia-Pacific Affairs

Wed 4/26

Image - Yasuyuki Sawada
This event is Canceled

The Asian Development Bank's 2017 Economic Forecast for Asia

Date: Wed, April 26, 2017
Time: 6:00 PM
Asia as a middle-income region

Dr. Yasuyuki Sawada, Chief Economist, the Asian Development Bank

Decades of rapid growth transformed developing Asia into a largely middle-income region, but the pace of expansion has fallen off since the 2008 global financial crisis. This has serious implications for American businesses and the global economy as a whole.

The Asian Development Bank (ADB) explores this challenge in its Asian Development Outlook 2017, a comprehensive economic forecast providing country and regional analysis and growth projections for 45 economies, including the People’s Republic of China, India and Indonesia. ADB's Chief Economist Yasuyuki Sawada will outline the report’s findings and policy options for innovation, education and infrastructure to spur growth in middle-income economies amid uncertainties ranging from protectionist threats to changing monetary policy.

Dr. Yasuyuki Sawada holds a doctorate degree in economics and a master's degree in international development policy from Stanford University. He also holds master's degrees in international relations and economics from the University of Tokyo and Osaka University, respectively, and a bachelor's degree in economics from Keio University in Japan.

Tue 5/2

Image - John Kamm

Reengaging China on Human Rights

Date: Tue, May 02, 2017
Time: 6:00 PM
Changing China–U.S. relations

John Kamm, Founder and Executive Director, The Dui Hua Foundation 

In 2016, there was no bilateral human rights dialogue between China and the United States, nor was there any dialogue on rule of law. The decision to disengage was mutual. Now Beijing and Washington, D.C. are considering how (and if) to reengage on two of the most sensitive topics in their relationship: human rights and rule of law.

Although President Trump has discussed many issues related to U.S.–China relations, he has remained largely silent on human rights. John Kamm’s Dui Hua Foundation has been conducting an unofficial dialogue with the Chinese government and judiciary for many years. This dialogue focuses on treatment of prisoners, juvenile justice, women in prison and the death penalty—all topics that could be covered if official dialogue is revitalized. Kamm, having just returned from Beijing, will provide a briefing on where things stand in both the official and unofficial dialogue between China and the U.S.