Upcoming Events: Health & Medicine

Thu 5/18

Image - O'Bryan

Autoimmune Fix

Date: Thu, May 18, 2017
Time: 12:00 PM
Discovering underlying causes of autoimmune disease

Dr. Tom O'Bryan, Author, The Autoimmune Fix; Faculty Member, Institute for Functional Medicine

Autoimmune diseases are a primary cause of morbidity and mortality in the industrialized world. The number of people diagnosed with an autoimmune disease is increasing exponentially in our country. Without recognizing and addressing the underlying mechanisms triggering the presenting complaints, the practitioner may be proverbially "chasing the tail" of the pathology with temporary symptom relief. This presentation will outline the development of autoimmune disease and its musculoskeletal and neurological presentations, with a deep emphasis on testing and treatment protocols that have consistently demonstrated dramatic results.

O'Bryan is internationally recognized speaker and writer on chronic diseases and metabolic disorders. He is considered the world expert on the impact of wheat sensitivity on autoimmunity. In 2013, he organized "the gluten summit," the first Internet gathering of more than 25 experts in a particular health field. More information can be found at www.TheDr.com.

Image - Sleep Apnea

Sleep Apnea: Creating Seamless Accountability for the Patient

Date: Thu, May 18, 2017
Time: 6:00 PM
Ways to treat sleep apnea

Robert Koenigsberg, CEO, SleepQuest, Inc.
William C. Dement, M.D., Ph.D., Chief Scientific Advisor, SleepQuest, Inc. 

The program will feature a presentation on how to diagnose and treat sleep apnea. Robert Koenigsberg, founder and CEO of SleepQuest, and William Dement, the world's leading authority on sleep, will give a number tips on how to get a good night's sleep and why this is important for overall health.

Dement is the world's leading authority on sleep, sleep deprivation and the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders.

Tue 6/13

Image - Cathryn Jakobson Ramin

Crooked: What It Takes to Outwit the Back Pain Industry and Get on the Road to Recovery

Date: Tue, June 13, 2017
Time: 6:00 PM
Recovering from back pain

Cathryn Jakobson Ramin, Journalist; Investigative Reporter; Author, Carved in Sand: When Attention Fails and Memory Fades in MidlifeCrooked: Outwitting the Back Pain Industry and Getting on the Road to Recovery

In an effort to manage her chronic back pain, investigative reporter and New York Times best-selling author Cathryn Jakobson Ramin spent years and a small fortune on a panoply of treatments. But her discomfort only intensified, leaving her feeling frustrated and perplexed. As she searched for better solutions, she exposed a much bigger problem. Costing roughly $100 billion a year, spine medicine—often ineffective and sometimes harmful—exemplified the worst aspects of the U.S. health-care system.

The result of six years of intensive investigation, her new book, Crooked, offers a startling look at the poorly identified risks of spine medicine, providing practical advice and solutions. Ramin interviewed scores of spine surgeons, pain management doctors, physical medicine and rehabilitation physicians, exercise physiologists, physical therapists, chiropractors, and specialized bodywork practitioners. She met with many patients whose pain and desperation led them to make life-altering decisions—and with others who triumphed over their limitations.

The result is a brilliant and comprehensive book that is not only important but essential to millions of back pain sufferers and all types of health-care professionals. Ramin shatters assumptions about surgery, chiropractic methods, physical therapy, spinal injections and painkillers while addressing evidence-based rehabilitation options—showing, in detail, how to avoid therapeutic dead ends and also save money, time and considerable anguish. With Crooked, she reveals what it takes to outwit the back pain industry and get on the road to recovery.

Thu 6/15

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Life After Diagnosis

Date: Thu, June 15, 2017
Time: 6:00 PM
Surviving serious illness

Dr. Steven Z. Pantilat, M.D., Professor of Medicine, the Department of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF); Kates-Burnard and Hellman Distinguished Professor in Palliative Care; Founding Director, the UCSF Palliative Care Program

Steven Pantilat, a renowned international expert in palliative care, will share innovative approaches for dealing with serious illness. In doing so, he will attempt to demystify the medical system, outlining the steps patients should take to deal with serious illness. Pantilat will cover the first steps after the diagnosis, finding the right caregiving and support, and planning your future so your loved ones don't have to. He will offer advice on how to tackle the most difficult treatment decisions and discussions to help us live as well and as long as possible.

Tue 6/27

Image - There Is No Good Card for This

There Is No Good Card for This

Date: Tue, June 27, 2017
Time: 6:00 PM
How to master empathy

Dr. Kelsey Crowe, Author; Speaker; Founder, Help Each Other Out
Dr. B.J. Miller Jr., Hospice and Palliative Care Specialist, UCSF Medical Center

When someone you know is hurting, you want to let her know you care. But many people don’t know the exact words to use—or are afraid of saying or doing the wrong thing. This thoughtful, instructive guide, from empathy expert Kelsey Crowe, blends well-researched, actionable advice with the no-nonsense humor and immensely popular empathy cards to help you feel confident in connecting with anyone experiencing grief, loss, illness or any other difficult situation.

Whether it’s a co-worker whose mother has died, a neighbor whose husband has been in a car accident or a friend who is seriously ill, Crowe advises you how to be the best friend you can be to someone in need.

Crowe is the founder of Help Each Other Out, which offers empathy bootcamp workshops to give people tools for building relationships when it really counts. She earned her Ph.D. in social work at the University of California, Berkeley and is a faculty member at the School of Social Work at California State University.

Miller is a hospice and palliative care specialist who treats hospitalized patients with terminal or life-altering illnesses at UCSF Medical Center. He also sees patients in a palliative care clinic and at the cancer symptom management service at the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Fri 6/30

Image - Brighter Day

A Brighter Day

Date: Fri, June 30, 2017
Time: 12:00 PM
Helping teenagers who are suffering from depression

Elliot Kallen, Financial Accountant; Wealth Manager; Founder, A Brighter Day
Patrick O'Reilly, Ph.D., Clinical Psychologist; Assistant Clinical Professor, UC San Francisco; Chair, Member-Led Psychology Forum—Moderator

Suicide is one of the leading causes of death among teens in the U.S. In this program, Elliot Kallen, who founded A Brighter Day in honor of his late son, Jake, and Dr. Patrick O'Reilly, who is a clinical psychologist specializing in anxiety disorders, will discuss depression and teen suicide. A Brighter Day reaches out to teens suffering from depression and other related issues while allowing them to maintain their dignity. The charity connects teens to the resources they need, showcasing local bands in a way that helps teens learn about depression and its risk factors.

Thu 8/17

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Good Health Starts in Your Home

Date: Thu, August 17, 2017
Time: 6:00 PM
Removing toxins to create a healthy lifestyle

Beth Greer, The Super Natural Mom®; Journalist; Author, Super Natural Home

What if you could get healthy by simply changing your home environment? Every day, we’re exposed to hundreds of untested chemicals: additives in food, endocrine disruptors in soap and shampoo, fumes in household cleaners. These chemicals comprise your “body burden” and can exacerbate allergies, asthma, fatigue, cough, headache and more serious health conditions.

Beth Greer had been living what she considered a healthy lifestyle when a medical crisis prompted her to reevaluate everything—from the food she ate to the personal-care products she used and the environment she lived in. She eliminated a sizable tumor in her chest without drugs or surgery by making small but powerful lifestyle shifts.

Greer, now one of the foremost experts on sustainable and toxin-free living, will share bite-sized wisdom she learned on her path back to health and give you a greater awareness of what goes in you, on you and surrounds you in order to radically improve your health and vitality. You will leave with simple, affordable ways to
• make safe, healthy product choices.
• understand vague and misleading food, personal care and cleaning labels.
• detect and eliminate electromagnetic radiation from cell phones, laptops and Wi-Fi.

As a consultant and speaker, Greer assists individuals and organizations in creating toxin-free, holistic homes and work environments as well as lifestyles that improve health, mood and performance. As an award-winning journalist, Greer was recently named one of the Top 50 Health and Environmental Journalists to Follow in 2016. Her best-selling book, Super Natural Home, was endorsed by Deepak Chopra and Ralph Nader. 

In addition to experiencing firsthand the powerful benefits of holistic, toxin-free living, Greer found powerful holistic approaches that helped her teenage daughter overcome ADHD and addiction to drugs and alcohol. Greer is the host of “Kids in Crisis” radio show, where she interviews leading medical experts and treatment professionals. She is also the former president of the Learning Annex. Some of her clients include: Google, LinkedIn, NBC, NPR, Rodale WellnessMartha Stewart LivingHealthPrevention and CNN. Learn more at BethGreer.com.

Wed 8/30

Image - Silk

Fake Silk: The Hidden Story of a Workplace Tragedy

Date: Wed, August 30, 2017
Time: 6:00 PM
The dark story of toxic silk

Dr. Paul D. Blanc, M.D., MSPH, Professor of Medicine and Endowed Chair in Occupational and Environmental Medicine, the University of California, San Francisco; Author, How Everyday Products Make People SickFake Silk: The Lethal History of Viscose Rayon; Blogger, Household Hazards (hosted by Psychology Today

In a comprehensive and disturbing history of viscose rayon, or “fake silk,” Paul Blanc sheds light on the environmental and public health hazards of producing this ubiquitous textile. In Fake Silk: The Lethal History of Viscose Rayon, Blanc asks a fundamental question: When a new technology makes people ill, how high does the body count have to be before protective steps are taken? This is a dark story of hazardous manufacturing, poisonous materials, environmental abuses, political machinations and economics trumping safety concerns. Blanc explores the century-long history of fake silk, which is used to produce products such as rayon textiles and tires, cellophane, and everyday kitchen sponges. He uncovers the grim history of a product that crippled and even served a death sentence to many industry workers while at the same time environmentally releasing carbon disulfide, the critical toxic component of viscose.

Blanc received his bachelor's degree from Goddard College, where he first became interested in health and the environment. He later trained at the Harvard School of Public Health (in industrial hygiene), the Albert Einstein School of Medicine and Cook County Hospital. He was a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar at the University of California, San Francisco and a Fulbright Senior Research Scholar at the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. He was a resident scholar at the Rockefeller Bellagio Center in Bellagio, Italy and at the American Academy in Rome. More recently, he was a fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University.

Thu 9/14

Image - Sara Gottfried

The Younger Protocol: Three Breakthrough Strategies to Reverse "Inflammaging," Reset Gene Expression, and Lengthen Healthspan

Date: Thu, September 14, 2017
Time: 6:00 PM
Lengthening one's healthspan

Dr. Sara Gottfried, M.D., Health Expert; Author, Younger

The younger protocol will show you how to recognize the warning signs of aging and inflammation (“inflammaging”)—worsening vision, weight gain, loss of muscle mass, thinner skin and faulty memory—and turn them around with evidence-based functional medicine. Recent data shows that 90 percent of disease is caused not by genes but by the environment surrounding your genes, much of which can be modified with lifestyle choices. Applying the science of epigenetics—the interaction of genes with the environment, which leads to heritable changes in the way DNA is expressed in your body—you will learn three key strategies that modulate the genes of aging. These strategies are taken from Gottfried’s seven-week protocol, which is the basis of her new book, Younger. The goal is lengthen one's healthspan—the period of time when you feel young, healthy, and in your prime—relatively free of disease.

Gottfried is a world-renowned health expert and a New York Times best-selling author. She practices functional medicine and evidence-based integration in her online courses. After graduating from Harvard Medical School and MIT, Gottfried completed her residency at the University of California, San Francisco. She lives in Berkeley with her husband and daughters. Visit her online at www.SaraGottfriedMD.com.

Thu 9/28

Image - Hacking of American Mind

The Hacking of the American Mind

Date: Thu, September 28, 2017
Time: 6:00 PM
The conflation of pleasure and happiness

Dr. Robert H. Lustig, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics, Division of Endocrinology, University of California, San Francisco; Director, UCSF Weight Assessment for Teen and Child Health (WATCH) Program

What is the difference between pleasure and happiness? These two positive emotions are often confused with each other, yet they couldn’t be more different. Pleasure is short-lived, visceral, usually experience alone, achievable with substances. Happiness, by contrast, is often the opposite—long-lived, ethereal, often experienced in social groups and cannot be achieved through substances. Pleasure is taking while happiness is giving. Pleasure relies on dopamine while happiness relies on serotonin. These too emotions involve two different neurotransmitters, regulatory systems and pathways in the brain.

But why should we care? Dopamine downregulates its own receptor: You get a hit, a rush—and then the receptors go down. Next time, you need more and more. Anything that generates pleasure can lead to addiction. Conversely, serotonin does not downregulate its own receptor, so you cannot overdose on too much happiness. There is one thing that does downregulate serotonin though: dopamine. The more pleasure we seek, the less happy we become.

In the last 45 years—in order to sell us their junk—Wall Street, Madison Avenue, Las Vegas and Silicon Valley have conflated pleasure with happiness so that we don’t know the difference anymore. Congress and the Supreme Court have codified corporate behavior, leaving us addicted and depressed. In the process, society has become fat, sick, stupid and broke. The only way to reverse this is by understanding the science of these two ostensibly “positive” emotions—how they interact and how to modulate them. Otherwise, those who abdicate happiness for pleasure will end up with neither.

Lustig is a neuroendocrinologist with basic and clinical training relative to hypothalamic development, anatomy and function. Prior to coming to San Francisco, he worked at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis. A native of Brooklyn, Lustig graduated from MIT and received his M.D. from Cornell University Medical College. He has been a faculty member at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and the University of Tennessee, Memphis. More information can be found here.